Friday, August 5, 2011

South Africa headed to Communist collapse? Marc Aupiais compiles a SACNS Diagram on the different views on nationalisation of South African Industry

Compilation by Marc Aupiais 5:08 PM CAT SAST 5th Day  / 08th Month / 2011


Nationalization
Cosatu Says
Mines Say
Communist Party
ANCYL Has called for nationalisation: citing major Banks by name, and asking mines be Nationalised, according to Carte Blanche footage of ANCYL President Julius Malema, and Press media
IOL; SAPA 5th August 2011 : At “University of Johannesburg on Thursday, Malema said: “Everyone has the right to benefit from wealth in South Africa. Since the debate on nationalisation, every rich family has spoken in defence of their property... all of them, they are in Stellenbosch, the Stellenbosch mafia.””



Business News says of mines:
“But it generated about 64% of the foreign exchange earnings from SA’s merchandise trade. Mining companies also dominated the JSE, accounting for more than 40% of its weight.

The African National Congress (ANC) Youth League has persuaded its mother body to investigate the nationalisation of mines, arguing that the policy would benefit the poor majority.

Earlier this week Mineral Resources Minister Susan Shabangu said consideration of the step was misguided, as the real issue was to address poverty, unemployment, and inequality. Public Enterprises Minister Malusi Gigaba warned that SA’s "reckless" nationalisation debate was deterring foreign investment

The ANC has repeatedly said nationalisation was not the party’s official policy, and it was awaiting a report from a team of experts it had assembled to examine state involvement in mining elsewhere in the world. The report is expected by the end of next year.

But ANC ally Cosatu claimed yesterday that nationalisation was inevitable, and the only decision to be made was how it would be implemented.

"If you say business needs certainty to make investments ... this is the certainty you need to have. What is being discussed now is the models," Cosatu economist Chris Malekane told a debate on nationalisation hosted by the South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Johannesburg yesterday.”

“"If business needs certainty on this issue, they should be certain that the ANC is not researching the feasibility of nationalisation -- it is researching models of implementation," Cosatu economist Professor Chris Malekane told the South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry’s (Sacci) discussion in Johannesburg.”
Chamber of Mines claim that the move is unsustainable, has never worked anywhere, and that they will fight it to the ends; to the Constitutional Court if they have to- they said to news program Carte Blanche. Industry has also invited debate, including trade unions to the table.
Calls the move nothing but an attempt to bail out ANC connected BEE mines.

Says poor will not benefit, that it is a temporary move to ease ANC BEE friends, which will then be reverse.

But Cosatu claims grassroots support the measure in the SACP.
““The model of nationalisation to be implemented would also not be restricted to the mining sector, but also apply to agriculture, general production and banks, according to Malekane.

"We'll have to compensate in the interests of the public, but not in a way that will cripple the South African state," he added.

This included land being owned by the state outright, and farmers paying a fee for its use, as arable land was a natural asset.”

Malekane maintained that support for nationalisation did not only come from the ANC Youth League, which had been the most vocal proponent of the policy, but also from ordinary members of the South African Communist Party (SACP), uMkhonto weSizwe (MK) Veterans Association and the ANC itself.

"If you were in the ANC national general council last year you would have realised that everyone was supporting nationalisation from the floor," he said.”
Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, and big business:

“Pick n Pay founder Raymond Ackerman says he is opposed to nationalisation as government's role was not to run companies.

“I don't believe even the government wants nationalisation,” Ackerman said on Thursday when interviewed on CNBC in Cape Town.

He went on to say that SA had plenty of opportunity, that it had a strong constitution and would not go the way of Zimbabwe.

“We have a wonderful constitution that would protect us from the likes of the ANCYL (African National Congress Youth League),” he said.”
ANCYL Shoots back at minister for saying he understood debate of the issue was hurting country’s image (something Industry had been claiming)

On Monday, Gigaba, a former ANC Youth League president, said the people who were running the country understood what the "acrimonious" debate on nationalisation was doing to investment.

The youth league said yesterday that it was relieved that, at last, Gigaba, "who never held a political view on any issue before, now has the courage to speak about nationalisation of mines, though with a wrong approach, vigour and very wrong information.

"We hope his suddenly found courage to speak about nationalisation of mines is not inspired by the American Chamber of Commerce, which he unfortunately was addressing," the league said.

It also questioned Gigaba's track record when he was president of the ANC's youth wing between 1996 and 2004, claiming that he "never had any impact [or] influenced any policy shift, including on youth development".”















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